Author: Zack (page 2 of 7)

1st Trimester Vaginal Bleeding

This is one of the most common chief complaints in all of Emergency Medicine. You will have one of these cases during your rotation. The most important thing to remember are your 5 tests and also how to present these cases to your attending.

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Heaton HA. Ectopic Pregnancy and Emergencies in the First 20 Weeks of Pregnancy. In: Tintinalli JE, Stapczynski J, Ma O, Yealy DM, Meckler GD, Cline DM. eds. Tintinalli’s Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 8e New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2016. http://accessemergencymedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=1658&sectionid=109434141. Accessed April 10, 2017.

Constipation

This week we are going to cover a basic approach to the constipated patient with a focus on the possible treatments for constipation.

Marathons

One of the best events you can volunteer for as a medical student is your local marathon. You learn about musculoskeletal injuries, heat injuries, electrolyte emergencies, as well as prepare yourself for the occasional seizure, cardiac arrest, and case of anaphylaxis. You learn procedures like starting IVs, obtaining vitals, and basic wound care. It really is a great place to learn the basics of Emergency Medicine. In this episode, we will discuss marathon related emergencies.

Summa

You’ve heard about this story by now. Today we are going to talk about what happened at the Summa EM residency program and why it closed. Even more importantly, we are going to discuss what we can learn from this and how to be smarter when choosing residency programs in the future.

DKA (Critical Diagnosis)

DKA is one of my favorite diagnoses to treat because it follows a nice, simple, algorithmic approach. These patients are incredibly sick, but your attending will be very impressed if you have an understanding of the basic protocol. The hardest thing to remember is that the blood sugar is the LEAST important part of DKA management. Dehydration, Hypokalemia, and Ketoacids play a much more important role.

Narcotics

As doctors, we treat pain. It’s good medicine, gets good patient satisfaction, and is usually why the patient came to the ED in the first place. But we are also in the middle of a prescription narcotic epidemic. So the question is, how do we appropriately and safely prescribe narcotics? Today we will cover the AAEM guidelines on the use of narcotics in the ED.

Laceration (Repair)

In this episode we will be discussing a laceration repair procedure. Don’t overcomplicate things. Keep it nice and simple. And you will be successful.

Laceration (Evaluation)

Laceration Repair is one of your core 3 procedures and is critical to master if you want to get a good SLOE. You have to very carefully consider if the wound should even be repaired at all! Otherwise it might get infected and the patient will have a bad outcome. However, if your presentation is strong, they will let you repair the wound, which will get you great scores on your SLOE.

Sore Throat

During my clerkship, every time a patient came in with a sore throat, my attending would ask me, “Zack, what are the 4 life threatening causes of sore throat!?”  I could never remember the answer, but after the episode today you will. Also, extra special thanks to Dr. O’Connell and Elsevier for allowing us to use the book USMLE Step 2 Secrets during this episode. We will be incorporating these questions into future shows as well. I hope you find it useful.

The Future of Trauma (Interview)

In this EM Bolus we will be discussing the future of trauma resuscitation with Dr. Sam Tisherman, a professor of trauma surgery at the University of Maryland. He is currently conducting a very interesting study that has the potential to drastically change our approach to trauma forever. What if we cool trauma patients after they have died? What if we make them VERY cold, like those stories of cold water drownings who recover after being underwater for over an hour? What if we fill our dead trauma patients with icy saline and take their body to the OR so we have time to fix their injuries? Will it be too late? Today we take you to the fringe of medical discovery and address all of these questions.

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