Category: Genitourinary/OB/GYN (page 1 of 2)

Urinary Tract Infection

Great blog post on topic… https://first10em.com/uti/

Ectopic Pregnancy

All women of childbearing age with abdominal pain need a pregnancy test

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (Critical Diagnosis)

Kidney stones are a diagnosis of exclusion. When you see flank pain or testicular pain or lower abdominal pain on that triage note, you have to consider leaking abdominal aortic aneurysm as well.

Testicular Torsion (Critical Diagnosis)

Kidney stones are a diagnosis of exclusion. When you see flank pain or testicular pain or lower abdominal pain on the triage note, you have to consider testicular torsion. Testicular torsion is a high risk, high morbidity diagnosis that is very time sensitive. 

Flank Pain (Kidney Stones)

Kidney stones are a diagnosis of exclusion…

 

Breast Complaints

Breast complaints are usually pretty straight forward. Just remember that all breast complaints are cancer until proven otherwise.

Delivering Babies

Performing an emergency delivery is very intimidating. The good news is that in most scenarios, as long as you don’t drop the baby, it should go very naturally. However, there are exceptions to this which we will cover today.

Non-Pregnant Vaginal Bleeding

This is the follow up to our previous episode on vaginal bleeding. This week, we will discuss an approach to vaginal bleeding when the patient is NOT pregnant.

 

1st Trimester Vaginal Bleeding

This is one of the most common chief complaints in all of Emergency Medicine. You will have one of these cases during your rotation. The most important thing to remember are your 5 tests and also how to present these cases to your attending.

 

Priapism

When I was on my clerkship, a few of my classmates had patients present to the emergency department with priapism. It’s not common. But even if you don’t get a case during your clerkship, you will certainly see one during residency. There are two types of priapism: ischemic and non-ischemic. Ischemic is the type we will focus on this week. It is the most common type and, unfortunately, the most dangerous type. But don’t be scared, it’s not that hard. Just remember your anatomy, and follow the 5 basic steps.

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